The Prodigal Developer Returns to Rails

It has been two days since I posted an article on auditing data modifications using the Zend Framework. I have recently published a number of other articles on Zend in general. I noticed a recurring statement that forced me to rethink the pursuit of using alternative frameworks for openEPRS:

“X is easier with Ruby on Rails than it is with (insert language and/or framework)”

When I started openEPRS in 2007, Ruby on Rails was the chosen platform. I liked it because it was easy to learn, concise and held close DRY development principles. It really is an amazing framework, one that is truly a disruptive platform.
Continue reading “The Prodigal Developer Returns to Rails”

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Audit Data Modifications with Zend_DB

One of the requirements for my electronic medical record prototype is ability to track data modifications as users interact with the system. I wanted to see how difficult this would be to accomplish using the Zend Framework. This exercise ranged from being extremely trivial with Ruby on Rails to quite convoluted using the Java Persistence API (JPA). A quick web search landed me at zed23 where I found an example by Ryan Brooks that was pretty close to what I was looking for. Continue reading “Audit Data Modifications with Zend_DB”

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Building PHP Projects with Phing

Now that I have NetBeans, Zend and XAMPP installed and configured (see this article), I moved on to find a build system for my project. I have used Ant for years and as luck would have it, there is an equivalent for PHP called Phing. The need for such a utility is multifold: document generation, unit testing, packaging your project for distribution, etc.

Continue reading “Building PHP Projects with Phing”

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A Word on Knowledge Base Articles

I thought I would make a quick comment on the knowledge base articles I have posted over the last couple of years. Someone recently asked why I would post an article on setting the JAVA_HOME environment variable in Ubuntu.

Like many Linux distributions, each one can have a slightly different way of doing something simple such as globally setting an environment variable. When I found the answer, I was going to put it in Tomboy. I thought, why not share my answer by adding it to a special category in my blog instead. In the past, I have found answers to technical questions on the web by others willing to share their knowledge. I decided to return the favor.

Some of my KB articles can be a little on the terse side, verging on being half-baked brain dumps to more useful step by step instructions on how to accomplish something. I hope some of you find them useful nonetheless!

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